Tuesday, July 17, 2012

"A visit to hell in Bernardo wing"




I was recently reminded of this article while responding to a reader comment about capital punishment. For the most part, I am of two minds on the subject. On one hand, it makes me want to wretch thinking about the financial cost to my country in housing, feeding, and clothing mongrels like Paul Bernardo; yet on the other hand, I can't deny that it the fact that a man who once struck fear into the hearts of thousands of women is now unable to take a shower without direct supervision.

Nick Pron spent years on the Bernardo case as a staff reporter for the Toronto Star, and published Lethal Marriage: The Unspeakable Crimes of Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka. Considered to be one of the foremost journalistic authorities on the case that gripped an entire nation, Pron was offered a chance to behold the blonde haired beast in his tiny cell within the confines of the notorious Kingston Penitentiary.

Those who think the Bernardo problem should have been solved with a bullet to the back of his head may change their stance somewhat after reading about Nick Pron's visit to the "Bernardo Wing."



Nick Pron, The Toronto Star
June 21, 2005

The sliding steel gate into hell opened slowly, and reluctantly I stepped into the closed world that is Paul Bernardo's home, and will be for the rest of his life.

Moments later, I was looking into the eyes of Canada's most notorious criminal. My heart filled with rage over what he had done. I had the overwhelming urge to scream at him.

While his former wife, Karla Homolka, will be a free woman in a few weeks — albeit hounded by the media — Bernardo will live out his life caged in a cell about the size of a walk-in closet.

How I came to be inside the Kingston Penitentiary that day is a story on its own.

A few days earlier, I had been out drinking with some buddies when one of them leaned over and whispered: "Would you like to see Paul Bernardo?"

"Of course," I replied, "but he's in jail."

"It can be arranged," said my friend.

The next morning I was standing at the front door of Kingston Penitentiary, on the shore of Lake Ontario. I had written about the institution many times, but had never been inside. That was about to change.

The door clanged shut behind me as I walked into the facility that was home to the country's worst criminals. There was not a wisp of fresh air inside the walls.

My tour took me first to the open range. As I craned my neck upwards and gawked at the rows of cells, I noticed that the receivers on the pay phones at the end of each floor were all off the hook. I was told that, if you wanted to use the phone, you first had to ask for permission from the inmate who controlled that particular floor. This was prison culture. But Bernardo would never be part of that closed society.

"Our guest of honour has his own special area," said my guide.

It was the ground floor wing for the worst of the worst, the sexual offenders who had to be housed by themselves for their own safety. Plexiglas across the bars in this area of the prison prevented other inmates from hurling objects at them. In prison culture, men who rape and kill children are considered the lowest of the low. Injuring them would be a badge of honour.

The gate to the "Bernardo Wing" suddenly opened and I stepped inside, albeit hesitantly.

The air inside was pungent with the rancid smell of caged men who are seldom allowed out of their cells.

As the gate clanged shut behind me, an inmate in the first cell jerked bolt upright from his bunk, pressing his face tight against the bars. His face was chalk white, his eyes wide as saucers, his gaze not of this world.

He stared at me, at times grinning, drool seeping from a corner of his mouth.

Opposite the cells was a bank of small television screens, two guards monitoring the activity in each cell via a closed circuit camera.

Extending upward from the floor and arching over the guards was a Plexiglas shield that ran the length of the range.

"Why the shield?" I naively inquired.

Just then, a stream of yellowish liquid came hurtling from one of the cells. "Duck," yelled my guide.

I dove for cover as the urine hit the shield and trickled harmlessly to the floor.

"That's why," said my guide, somewhat amused as I picked myself off the deck and looked upward at yet another white face peering down at me from the second row, grinning, his front teeth missing.

The shield was dotted with urine stains, spit, feces. Then came a second volley of yellow fluid. The two guards seated at the screens never even looked up. Such was life in this special section.

One of the inmates started yelling. "Forty-seven," he screamed. "Forty-seven," over and over again. His screams cut through the deathly silence of the range. My temples began throbbing in pain.

And then I saw him. A chill ran through my body.

Paul Bernardo, probably this country's most despised killer, was standing at the front of his second floor cell, glancing down at the wary visitor in the prison's most restricted zone.

Our eyes locked. His appearance was shocking. Gone was the smirk, the cockiness that was Bernardo's trademark. He was heavier, his features blowsy, his face white. The man who terrorized women for years in Scarborough, the monster who killed two teenagers in St. Catharines, the villain who stalked potential prey in Orlando, Fla., was safely behind bars. Hopefully forever.

At his trial, I sat three rows directly behind Bernardo in courtroom 6-1 on University Ave. Although I work the court beat, for years afterwards I couldn't bring myself to even venture into that courtroom for fear it would rekindle memories of that gruesome trial.

Even though he was shackled and watched closely by several guards during the trial, he still had that trademark smirk, that cocky attitude that somehow he was going to talk his way out of a lifetime sentence behind bars.

As his four-month trial dragged on in 1995 I began fantasizing about hurting the man who had hurt so many people. In my daydream, I would vault over the benches, grab him by the neck, throw him to the floor and give him a punch in the mouth for each of his victims. For good measure, I would throw in a couple of extra blows for myself.

Was I losing it, I wondered. The Star had brought in a counsellor to talk to those who were covering the trial and editing the copy. "I'm fine," I told her. I wasn't. One evening after court, when a group of reporters covering the trial gathered at a bar to drown our anguish in booze, I blurted out my fantasy.

To my surprise, several others had been thinking the exact same thing. Like me, they wanted their frontier-style justice. Such was the hatred for this evil creature staring down at me from his cage.

I thought about that as I looked back at him. I suddenly had the urge to yell at him, like two of his friends had done shortly after his arrest, standing outside the Metro East Detention centre and cursing at his cell.

But the words got stuck in my throat. His gaze was vacant, the cockiness long gone. My anger eased. He disappeared back into his cell. The moment passed. We continued the tour.

"People wanted him to rot in jail," I said, and my guide finished my thought: "I think they got their wish," he said.

"If you really want to experience what life is like right now for Mr. Bernardo," said my guide, "you have to go inside a cell."

We found an empty one, similar to the cage where Bernardo lives 23 hours a day, 365 days a year, getting out only for his daily bit of fresh air in a small, fenced-in compound, or showering twice a week, always watched.

The cell was tiny. If you want the same experience, step into a small walk-in closet and close the door. There was a bunk on one side, a toilet at the far end.

The cell was about three paces long, and about as wide as Bernardo's arm span. Claustrophobia set in immediately. I felt trapped, and thought of animals in the zoo in small cages, and how horrible must be their existence.

"I've had enough," I said, turning to leave, just as the bars behind me shut. "What are you doing?" I asked my guide, now my jailer, standing on the other side of freedom.

"You wanted the full experience," he said.

"But I didn't mean it," I pleaded, grabbing at the bars. They didn't budge.

I turned back into my new home. I shuddered. The throbbing in my head was now a pounding pain. A minute in a locked cage and the big, tough crime writer was on the verge of tears.

My guide fumbled through his pockets. "Oops," he said, "I may not have the key."

"I need to be out," I pleaded, as he searched his pockets. He was taking his time, enjoying the moment. I was terrified.

Finally, he found the key and I was freed.

My total time in captivity: a minute, 30 seconds. I vowed never to get so close to a story again.

"Someday — not now — but someday I want you to write about your little visit to Kingston," said my guide.

"Mr. Bernardo will live, grow old and die in there. He'll have plenty of time to think about his crimes. The public should know that each and every day for the rest of his life will not be pleasant."

The door to the prison shut behind us. I had my freedom. Bernardo never would.He was declared a dangerous offender, which allows the authorities to sentence him indefinitely to jail, pending regular reviews.

"Know what?" I said to my guide. "I would rather take a needle in the arm than live like that."

"Just be thankful," said my guide, "that we no longer have capital punishment in this country."


67 comments:

  1. To be locked up for life like that is harder then death.Death would be fast and easy. Sitting in a cell day in and day out is nothing more then a slow death.

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    1. That's why I don't like the death penalty, it's too easy. Thinking of people like Bernardo, with such a high sex drive, and has always had control over people, now he's told what to do, what to eat ect.

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    2. If living the rest of your days in a tiny jail cell were really so much worse than death, than why do 99% of the convicted fight to spend the rest of their lives in a tiny jail cell, rather than for the much nicer by comparison quick death by execution? If human shaped cancers like Bernardo were just like you and me, he would not have committed these crimes at all. So "dooming" him to spend decades "thinking about what he's done" is not going to result in the soul searching you think it will. No, it will only give him time uninterrupted by work or obligations to replay the horrors in his head like his own private Rocky Horror Picture Show nightly cult marathon. Failing to scrape these metastases from our midst is just our sheer cowardice.

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    3. 'Dostevosky thought so-'Crime and Punishment' One major missing element for the convicted ,evil, killers is presuming a conscience or remorse which the vast number of psychopaths LACK; worry more is that with all their 'time', they can re-live their memories of sadistic atrocities to women and children! We can't monitor or measure that at all... (Kim P)

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  2. I agree, Anon -- being locked in a tiny cell for 23 hours out of the day would be a fate even worse than death. Methinks it would be even more unbearable for someone like Bernardo, who always thought of himself as God's Gift to Women - heh, now he's God's Gift to a stainless steel toilet.

    I just wish that this long, slow death didn't come with such a mighty price tag.

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    1. I feel sorry for him in some ways,I ask myself are we has bad has him,killing him.we are murderers.now the guy a ass.but doing something like this,,he still has tv.free food.hes dad brings him paper.pens.he gets 5.76 a day in wages,to buy more stuff,than what hes dad already give him.he has a radio.they even gave him a picture on hes wall.no kidding,hes dad bought him pillow cases,sheets,there sheets of course,read,he has it made in some ways.and they give him antidepressant,so now what do you think,how do I no.my friend worked with him.in hes so call hell.maybe to him hes in heaven,no worries,everything payed for.laugh on you.lol

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    2. That man & "heaven" will never be one in the same once he's done with this life in "hell" he will most definitely have another hellish life waiting for him, he will never be free

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    3. God can forgive him if he wants. I happen to like Paul a little. Just don't know him.

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  3. Thank you for this. I am quite happy for my taxes to help pay for him to be trapped and miserable for the rest of his life. All I ask is that he never, never gets out.

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    1. I don't think Mr. Bernardo will ever see the light of day. If they let him out, I will eat my hat (and a pair of boots, too)!

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  4. Bernardo's life prison is better than a lot of people out there who never committed unspeakable crimes. He has a roof over his head, 3 meals a day...he's being taken care of by the gov't for the rest of his miserable life. The prison system coddles him b/c of his notoriety & he is protected from the well deserved justice that could be meted out by the other inmates...I don't think Bernardo suffers from much of anything except excessive comfort & boredom.

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    1. Oh, I think he suffers... If you read the transcript of his interview with police in 2007, he seems to believe that he will be able to get out of prison one day. The fact that he's obviously still very clearly insane and deluded should make for a very unpleasant lifetime stay in the big house.

      However, things can only get better for him once Kingston Pen. closes. It's basically the nastiest place you could ever dream of, so no matter where they send him, it's bound to be an improvement. See the size of that cell? I'd hang myself with my own hair if I had to live like that, 24/7.

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    2. But I am all for letting a-holes like Bernardo either sink or swim in general population; the fact that the worst of the worst are protected in Canadian prisons is hard to believe.

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    3. Kitty - we have a responsibility to inmates, since they don't have the freedom to escape from danger.

      Further, are you condoning murder in some creepy kind of way - what exactly are you hoping to happen in the general population?

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    4. Anon - coddles him? Maybe you should read the article again.

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    5. The sentence was 20 years with the added dangerous offender status , the dangerous offender designation is reviewed every two years so it's been 20 years and on the 25th year Bernardo is eligible for parole. Not likely he will be paroled but he can be transferred to minimum security and he would have a case as many other inmates as bad as he have been moved to minimum security. With minimum security it's not far from a half way house or day parole. They can't block this eventuality because others have been granted this who his status.

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    6. Oh don't say that!! For those poor parents sake. I don't think so, there's nobody even half as bad as that thing!! What the hell is wrong with anyone who thinks that!! After what he did.

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  5. I wonder if anyone has interviewed him since he's been locked up. Is that permitted? It would be a creepy interview, to say the least.

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    1. Hi, Kevin! Thanks for reading!

      Paul Bernardo was interviewed in 2007 by Toronto police regarding a number of unsolved sex assaults that occurred during his reign of terror in the region.

      More information here: http://mascaramurder.blogspot.ca/2012/03/paul-bernardo-police-interview-june.html

      Cheers!

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    2. I love to be in a cell with him.but he coundnt touch me,let him suffer,,and talk dirty to him.but in the same cell,but he coundnt touch me.make him suffer,and im hot,lol

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    3. Unless you're a 15 year old girl he doesn't much have a need for women older...even if you are hot. As for talking to dirty, he wouldn't like that either. He's the type of guy who likes to be in control and likes his women gagged and tied. If you're gagged and tied in his cell and look like a child, that may work.

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  6. I know u from old wkh forums. Didn't know you had a blog. It is excellent. I'm reading it like a novel.

    I kinda like Bernardo in solitary, as I don't want him to die quickly in prison -- I want him to suffer. My fear is that someday, he very well may be released, though. But even if that were to happen, I don't think he'd be relocating to the French Antilles. I really don't believe he'd last 10 mins in society.

    Having said that, I thought the same for Karla, but lo and behold, 3 kids later...

    I really miss the KH Deathclock :)

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    1. I don't think Paul will ever see the light of day unobstructed by bars and barbed wire. In fact, if he is ever released, I will literally eat my hat :D

      Glad you're enjoying the material here!

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  7. I am not sorry for Paul Bernardo, but I will never ever, for the life of me understand all you cry me a river liberals/humanists who have no reservations boasting about doing violence to other people. Your glib ability to express concern for the other and to add insult to injury of popular victim in the same sentence! You either love ALL humanity or you don't love one single human being, it's that simple. Just listen to yourself:

    "In my daydream, I would vault over the benches, grab him by the neck, throw him to the floor and give him a punch in the mouth for each of his victims. For good measure, I would throw in a couple of extra blows for myself."

    Atta boy! There's a voice of reason! If I was John Wayne and Garry Cooper I would be creaming my shorts right now. However, you're a coward and you disgust me.

    If you're such a macho man 12 inch (+ head) avenger, I am inviting you to giddy up and roam the world saving people left and right. Go to India right now where they're suffering with gangrapes: form a group and eradicate rapes in Delhi.

    In case I didn't reach your liberal self-righteousness, let me point it blank at you: you caused as much damage with this article as Paul Bernardo did with his rapes.

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    1. Same anonymous as above(june 29 2014)I just have to throw in my comment anytime someone say's something obnoxious as that. He should be tortured to death like those girls were. It's a crying shame that they didn't "throw him in the yard with the rest of the boys"like doug french stated august 1 2013!! Well put doug. I couldn't have said it better myself


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  8. Caused as much damage? Are you serious? Your scale is sorely in need of calibration.

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  9. I'm not a liberal, and I never claimed to be perfect.

    If I ran into Karla homolka, I probably wouldn't physically touch her -- but I'd harass the hell out of her. The deathpool reference was simply because it obviously made her uncomfortable. I get a sense of schadenfreude. If it were a serious thing, she wouldn't have made it out of Montreal.

    Many people verbalize that which they would never do. Evidently, its the ones who fly under the radar we need to be concerned with.

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  10. Kitty, I wasn't aware you are Nick Pron! Good show!

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    1. According to another news source not Nick Pron, who has made a bundle of money off of this case, Bernardo works in the prison library.

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  11. One of the things that troubles me about this case and others like it is we all act as though these people are anomalies, monsters, not human. And yet, we live in a world that has seen far greater atrocities committed by so called normal people. I'm thinking of events like the Holocaust, when several thousand people apparently developed collective insanity and brutally murdered millions of people. The vast majority of them went home after the war and lived relatively unremarkable lives with their families, hiding much like Karla Homolka beneath the excuse, "we were scared and just following orders." If you know anything about the Stanley Milgram experiments, he basically proved that normal people would become monsters under the right circumstances, and for that he got thrown out of Yale. We want to think psycho this, crazy that, but the truth of the matter is...if we could get away with it, would we be the same way? I have to wonder if Bernardo's pathology was not his sick and twisted mind, but his delusional belief that he was a "deadly innocent guy" and wouldn't get caught. I have always wondered who I would have been had I lived in Nazi Germany...would I be someone persecuting Jews, someone who observed and did nothing, or someone who actively opposed the regime and tried to help Jews? The truth of the matter is I think I would have done nothing as long as it wasn't my ass. I fear that not much separates me from the Karlas of the world. I fear that there really isn't all that much that separates any of us from the Paul Bernardos and Karlas of the world. We are a very violent race, and that has been proven over and over again throughout history. Chances are that in a different place and different time, Paul's crimes would have been heralded as those of a hero. Read The Iliad and The Odyssey...when the Greeks sacked Troy, they raped and pillaged and murdered, and yet their actions live on in history as the acts of heroes.

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    1. "I fear that not much separates me from the Karlas of the world."

      Very well said, Anon. Personally, I think one of the reasons why I have maintained such an interest in this case (and in Homolka, in particular) is because I see a great deal of myself in her... And yet although we share many common interests, and have similar backgrounds, I know with every fibre of my being that I could never do the brutal, awful things that she has done.

      So, what's the *real* difference? Free will, followed by voluntary action. I think just about anyone is technically capable of atrocities, but fortunately, most of us choose to resist our more base desires in favour of the greater good.

      Thanks for your comment :)

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    2. What separates you from a Karla Kitty is human compassion, a conscience and the ability to show remorse. Homolka cannot. She believes her lie that she was controlled. Just as OJ simpson believes he didn't kill his ex wife and Ronald Goldman. I agree with you that most are , given the right circumstances capable or attrocities. Where we differ from a Homolka is we couldn't live with what we'd done. Homolka easily can

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  12. One thing I find funny is the author describes Paul as "heavier". You look at that picture and he has lost at least 15kg from the days he was dating Karla.
    I'm almost certain he's committed other murders but won't say because it will lesson his slim chance of getting parole when his older.

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    1. I should note that the photo accompanying this article wasn't originally paired with the text -- I selected the image to go along with Pron's piece. I think the photo was taken shortly after he was incarcerated, and the article was written later; Bernardo actually had gained a considerable amount of weight at that time. I had a family member working in KP at around the same time who confirms that Bernardo was really quite hefty for a time. As of his last interview with police in 2007, it looked as though he had lost much of the bulk he had put on.

      As for his chances at ever seeing parole, I'm sure he dreams about it every night but I don't see it ever (ever) happening.

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    2. not as long as the victims' family are alive.

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    3. Paul Bernardo's sentence is 20 years , not life. The dangerous offender status means no release date, however this dangerous offender designation is reviewed every two years meaning that if he is able to convince the board he is no longer a threat this designation can be lifted , hence he automatically becomes eligible for parole because he has passed his 20 year original sentence. If not paroled he can then apply for a transfer to a minimum security facility and he will probably get it because others of his status have been granted this transfer so there are several presidents. In a minimum security environment no more solitary confinement and he gets general population keeping in mind that this facility no one is going to bother him and risk their parole chance of getting out. Soon after there can be day parole or even a half way house. If Bernardo is ever released no one will know the exact day or time and going by past cases the inmate is usually released weeks before anyone finds out about it.

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    4. Who the hell are you,his father lol. Gimme a break!!

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  13. Karla is just as,if not more evil and you lot let HER go.....Disgraceful....You have the ruined lives of three poor little innocent kids on your hands whom Karla should never have been allowed to have, and the deaths of those poor young women whose deaths go partially unserved by justice....Dont forget he didnt kill until she became involved!!! What do the families of the victims think about their judicial system??? And canadians carry on bitching about everybody else.....Karla Homolkas agreement should have been annulled the moment the tapes were seen and the world realised she was just as responsible....Do the Canadian government hope some vigilante will do their dirty work for them??? I doubt they will - why else would she have had kids????Who will kill the mother of 3 young babies, no matter how evil she is??? She is a dangerous psychopath who should have been tried for EVERYTHING she did...
    I love Canada and canadians especially but you guys do bitch about everyone like youre perfect...but youre not and this case makes the world feel sick....

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    1. Thanks for your comment, Anon. Believe me, Karla Homolka is hated far more here in Canada than anywhere else in the world. Most of the people I have talked to who are familiar with her case feel betrayed by the criminal justice system and the government which oversees its administration.

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  14. he killed three teenagers, not two.....and is suspected of killing more women - for example........the unsolved murder of Debbie Silverman in Sunderland, Ontario (north of Scarborough, where Bernardo lived at the time)

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  15. Debbie Silverman was abducted in 1978....he was a child then. Elizabeth Bain, however, I bet you ...........

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  16. I wonder if he still looks the same as his 2007 interview. There haven't been any pics of out since then. There should be an update of how he's living and looks so the public knows he's not living too comfortably. I hate how all these serious criminals get so much privacy when in jail.

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  17. I like the valuable information you provide in your articles. I will bookmark your weblog and check again here frequently. I'm quite sure I'll learn many new stuff right here! Best of luck for the next

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  18. It is very possible that Karla did the actual killing. It has never been definitively proved either way. He couldn't care less about Karla. He liked young, innocent, virgin girls- the opposite of Karla. She was a cover story for him, Nobody suspected Ken & Barbie. That's how they got away with it for so long. When he became to attached to a particular girl, she became jealous and murdered them. If the girl stayed too long she could have gotten Stockholm Syndrome and became a long-term captive/lover, which could potentially leave Karla out in the cold. She was desperate to keep him. She was nothing without him. To date, she has never expressed remorse for the murders. Sociopaths don't show remorse.

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    1. They both are despicable excuses for human beings and should be rotting in prison for as long as they live. It infuriates me to see how much we spend on keeping these ppl fed, clothed, medical and dental access while there are senior citizens and younger ppl living on the streets, hungry begging for food and or money, wearing dirty clothes and rummaging through garbage bins for food/cigarette butts. So sad! I would love for him to have his 1 hr a day with the general population. He wouldn't make it til the end of the first 15 mins...lol

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  19. Someone who is the leader of her high school clique can easily become influenced by an older man. When you're a junior in High School, you're considered cool just for dating a senior. She was dating an adult, who was already a serial rapist. Look at how radically and quickly her appearance changed after she hooked up with Paul. She went from a frizzy-haired dirty blonde ala Barbara Streisand to a flat-ironed-with-bangs platinum blonde like a Playboy bunny. He broke her down with verbal and physical abuse until she thought she was completely dependent on him. He was already tired of her and he wanted her younger sister.... Karla told police she "was angry because Paul and Kristin French had been drinking champagne out of special glasses from France, that Paul and Karla never used." This was more upsetting to her then his crimes. She was still jealous, even though he was a monster. She had to stay number one in his life, so she killed the girls.

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  20. I honestly believe Karla killed the girls. That is why Paul had no video of their deaths, he wasn't there when they died. She did it. The evil bitch got away with it all.

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  21. it is such a logical reasonmemt, and yet, her own lawyer managed to help fooling a whole Court system. bravo! How come they listened to her and accepted her suggestions that karla should be treated differently? She helped her to play the role of a victim, to get a mild sentence, Her role should have ended there, but she went further, she offered karla her brother Thierry as a husband, so that Karla could have the nice Babies she wanted. Not a thought for how the kids would feel to have such a mother. II guess she is a guadeloupean like me, I feel ashamed. These two women seem to have found each other.

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  22. On two occasions, I have written short but precise notices that were published in the local papper France -Antilles, about Èmily Bordelais living in Guadeloupe and raising 3 Children there.So I´m sure people read them. I found out that many guadeloupeans are aware of her past. Most people Think that she is a criminal who cannot have changed. 12 years in prison don´t erase the perversity and lack of empathy of a person. I continue to Exchange thoughts with others, and I blame the Canadian Court in charge of the case, for being irresponsable and for not showing any respect for us, Guadeloupeans.

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    1. Anonymous,
      Thank you for your efforts. If you ever post notices again, I hope you'll ask Guadeloupians to watch out for the welfare of her children - since what their mother (or father) did is not a burden they should have to bear.

      You're right that this is largely the fault of the Ontario and Canadian governments. I'm very sorry that she managed to find a way to export herself to your country without anyone intervening or warning the local government. Canadians are happy to be rid of her (well, I'm sure most of us would prefer that she return here to properly pay for her crimes), but we don't actually wish her on any other place. Well, h*ll would be OK with me. She could work on her tan there too.

      If you ever hear anything about the family she's married into I'm sure the readers of this blog would appreciate if you updated people here (or contacted the website owner privately). It's always been a concern re: what kind of man would marry (or want to marry) a convicted serial killer. And it seems no-one knows anything about her current husband. This is important, because all the psychological profiles of Karla in prison said that she has a very strong tendancy to involve herself with very bad men (the term is hybristophilia), and she proved that was true by hooking up with Jean Paul Gerbet in prison. Everyone who is familiar with her knows that all the assertions that she may not be a danger are thrown out the window if she hooks up with another violent man. For everyone's sake - especially her children - I hope that's not so. But we know nothing about Thierry other than that he (supposedly) willingly married a known sadistic serial killer/rapist/torturer, and I've read a rumour that he has a criminal record.

      Thank you again for fighting the good fight down there.

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  23. He should be released into the general prison population, he will be ass raped and killed in a matter of time. It wouldn't surprise me if someday someone either harms or kills Karla. I'm surprised it hasn't happened yet. She should have a cactus rammed up her vagina!!

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    1. Both he and she should pay the appropriate sentence for their crimes (and yes, I don't normally support the death penalty but in this case I would). But what you're advocating makes you no different than they are. We can all ask for justice, but we don't need to become inhumane while doing it.

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  24. This is my question: If death is something that everyone must experience at some point how is it such terrible punishment? Those who do get the death penalty are assured it not be painful and given ample time to find peace and forgiveness - whether it's real, imagined or just absurd. The human mind can rationalize anything it wants any way it can. Simple fear of impending death is no punishment it's commonplace - good people that have diseases experience it all the time - or worse, parents of sick children. Death is a natural part of life. If the death penalty serves any purpose at all it's a sense of peace for the victims but what those victims in their rage and sorrow don't think about is that it also gives the criminal time to find it.

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  25. I am very surprised that nobody had taken Karla out by now. She lives happy and content in the Caribbean now with her 3 kids and hubby. I have a tendency to agree that she was the murderer and I firmly believe that if she found the right person again...she would do it all over. She just has to find another sociopath. In cases like this a little vigilante justice is called for. For her in her little world she has created and for Paul in prison. Put him in with the general population and let nature take its course.

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  26. Something about this annoys me. He had a teammate and his teammate was given a second chance despite doing every single thing he did. 25 years in a cell that tiny is enough time, even for him. Even Karla is watched like a hawk every day of her life since being released. He would be watched as well, and wouldn't commit any more crimes. Who are we to judge whether someones entire life should be dropped or spent in a ridiculously small cell? He made serious disgusting mistakes, but 25 years is enough time to allow him a second chance.

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    1. You have got to be kidding, Anonymous. I see that you didn;t offer to take him into your home if he were to be released. Why not? Since you think he's so harmless, it shouldn't be a problem for you. You obviously have not been the victim of a sexual predator. You ask who are we to judge....is that a serious question? He committed the crime, therefore, we judge. That's how it works!! You just don't get it.... smh.

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  27. Anonymous... ur a fool. people such as him should never see the light of day ever again. it sickens me knowing karla got out so early just because she made a deal with the police before they realised she raped her own sister with a wine bottle amongst other things. She's re married with 2 children living on an island in an ocean front mansion. because she sold her book and her story. Foolish canadian laws.As if the police needed her to testify to get him. WTF

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  28. ALSO.... Its human nature to survive. I believe him knowing when his last day is will haunt him more than staying in jail. all prisoners adjust (go mentally ill) knowing they will never leave. Im all for the death penalty. it costs $75k/yr to house 1 kingston inmate. A one time $15 electricity bill works for me

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  29. i was wrong about the mansion.

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  30. Respectfully, I don't think being a live in a cell and being fed (and he has a TV) and the basics is a fate worth than death even if its most of that person's time. These kind of people always lived in their fantasies and delusions, as long as they have a brain, they will entertain themselves reliving their crimes, figuring ways out of their fix, and fantasizing about all sorts of sick things and how wonderful and tragic they truly are. That's why capital punishment is a better fate for these types of offenders. There a video on You Tube where he is being interviewed and said he saw on TV that he was called a 'liar' and was angry about it...he looked pretty healthy and cocky on that video from a couple years ago. So he was mad about being called a liar and was saying 'Yeah yeah, the psychopath rapist thing, we all know that, yeah yeah' like that had less importance now in comparison to the slander he's suffering.

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  31. I'm convinced he did the murders. I'm strangely fascinated by KH though - I'd love to see inside her mind. How can she go from serial sex killer to knitting eco mama?! She loves attachment parenting ffs! It just doesn't add up! She's like two people in one - crazy sex killer and loving organic mama! Crazy! Does Paul realise she's remarried with three children?? I'd love to know his opinion on it!

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  32. I'm convinced he did the murders. I'm strangely fascinated by KH though - I'd love to see inside her mind. How can she go from serial sex killer to knitting eco mama?! She loves attachment parenting ffs! It just doesn't add up! She's like two people in one - crazy sex killer and loving organic mama! Crazy! Does Paul realise she's remarried with three children?? I'd love to know his opinion on it!

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  33. I think he murdered Elizabeth Bain as well. So if Im correct this means he actually did murder without Karla involved or present . I truly believe Paul, not Karla is the one that actually murdered those girls (with the exception of Tammy). I think he just got lucky when he figured out how to control Karla after Tammy's accidental death. He knew Karla would do anything to keep how Tammy actually died a secret. She was more scared of what her parents and Lori would think of her than ANYTHING. Karla knew keeping Paul happy was the only way her secret would stay a secret and I think he enjoyed having that kind of power over her. The question I want to ask is why was a man the age of Paul living with a seventeen year old vulnerable girl in the first place. So many things I find unsettling. Don't get me wrong I think she should've put her foot down from the beginning as soon as he started asking for her baby sister as Christmas present , but I think when Karla realized she was responsible for Tammy's death she just went intoake Paul happy , he won't tell, I'll be o.k. mode. Its really sad . Karla had no self esteem. Hopefully she has matured enough to make her own good choices for the sake of society and her own children.

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